Medicinal flowers (part I)

For several centuries, medical practitioners have long acknowledged the therapeutic properties of certain flowers. More than just spanning time, this knowledge also spans many cultures around the world. One of the greatest advantages is that flowers and plants offer completely natural medicinal properties, often without the scary side effects that modern pills and medications bring on. Furthermore, remedies made from flowers can be much cheaper than drugs marketed by pharmaceutical companies.

But today we are going to talk about flower medicine where all we are using is the flower itself. Here are a few:

Mullein (Verbascum thapsus)

Mulleins are found on the flower stalk of the second year plant. These little yellow blossoms are perfect to make into an ear oil for those in your family who struggle with painful infections.

Chamomile (Matricaria recutita)

Of course it’s the chamomile bloom that we use to make that most famous of all relaxation teas. The sunny, white and yellow chamomile flowers must be picked every day. They are delicate and need to be dried quickly. A taste of chamomile can relax the nervous system, help us sleep, or calm an upset stomach.

Not only beautiful, chamomiles have amazing benefits

Lavender (Lavendula angustifolia)

It is the lavender bud, picked just as it is opening, that is used in Western herbalism. They can be a bit bitter (so don’t add too much to a tea), but they are perfect to help soothe nerves, calm anxiety, or quiet a headache.

Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium)

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, mums are important for eye health, colds, and fevers. These small white and yellow blooms show up in the fall and can be picked almost daily while they last. They can be used fresh or dry.

Isn’t it great that such beautiful flowers are much more than decor pieces and can actuall help you feel better on a day-to-day basis?

Stay tooned, next week we’ll talk to you about a few more…

 

 

 

 

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